Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Leg Goes, Mind Goes, Lungs Go” by Caroliner Rainbow Hands Replaced By Oversized Rocks:

A friend of mine brought Caroliner up in conversation last week and was astonished I’d never heard of them. My initial forays into their world make me sad I hadn’t, but glad I now have. It’s a hell of a world.

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Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “La Noche y Tu” by Mariachi Los Camperos:

I’ve been rereading parts of Chicano Soul by Ruben Molina this week, and there’s a particularly nice passage on pages 58 to 59 in which Max Uballez, who played guitar in The Romancers, describes how he learned to play by mimicking a mariachi band that practiced in his neighborhood. He also talks about holding the record of this song in his hands and imagining holding his own record his hands one day. I love this live performance, but here’s the recorded version in case you’re interested, too. Mariachi is such a wonderful genre.

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Song of the Week: “Bois Barbu” by Grand Veymont

by Douglas Cowie on 19 July 2019

Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Bois Barbu” by Grand Veymont:

Last week I posted a song by the wonderful Bess of Bedlam and this week it’s time for a song by the other band I saw a couple of weeks ago in Dalston, Grand Veymont. I went to this gig in the first place because my friend Warren, who knows a lot about certain types of French music past and present (probably future, too, for all I know), suggested that missing it would be a dumb move. It turns out that Warren (as usual) was correct. I spent a certain amount of the set imagining a supergroup where these two wonderful musicians perform with Yo La Tengo, but I spent most of the set absolutely swimming in the rhythms and melodies they created.

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Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Brambles of Dourlens” by Bess of Bedlam:

Last week I saw Bess of Bedlam at the Servant Jazz Quarters, as part of a bill headlined by Grand Veymont. Her music, as you can hear on this song, pulls folk and baroque influences together with a sense of adventure, and with lyrics that are poetic, playful, and rooted in historical curiosity and feminist politics. It was an enthralling musical performance.

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