Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Baden” by Mostly Other People Do the Killing:

I’ve been listening to a lot of jazz lately, in part because I’ve been playing a lot of trumpet lately, and in part just because, uh, you know, I like it.  I recently came across Mostly Other People Do the Killing while listening to “The Slim and Him Show” on WRCU-FM, which is hosted by a couple of friends of mine.  Mostly Other People Do the Killing is some serious music-school stuff: these guys have chops and you can practically hear the theory when you’re listening to their music; but you can also hear the layers of music history they’ve absorbed through some serious listening, and you can also, most importantly, hear the full-bore fun fun fun they’re having, and daddy don’t seem to be taking the T-bird away anytime soon.

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Song of the Week: “Call to Arms” by Sturgill Simpson

by Douglas Cowie on 24 February 2017

Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Call to Arms” by Sturgill Simpson:

So, your band has been invited to perform on national television.  Are you nervous? Are you worrying about not making mistakes? Or do you know that you’re in the best band on earth, because this band is your band, and your band was made for you and me, and so you and your band go out there and use your two songs to show the rest of the world just how awesome your band is?  Did Sturgill Simpson leave any sinew out of this performance? Did Sturgill Simpson’s drummer leave any muscle out of this performance? Did Sturgill Simpson’s bassist leave any tendon unstrained? Did Sturgill Simpon’s lead guitarist leave any drop of blood unpumped?  Did that organ player who looks like a Ramone not wear out the soles of his shoes? Did the trumpet player not dad-dance to the best of his ability while blowing the highest, loudest, hardest notes? Did the trombonist not crank those blurps and blaps and that big riff with all his might? Did the tenor and baritone sax player leave a note unrumbled across his two instruments? Was this not the greatest call to country-blues-rock-n-roll arms you ever saw on television? Good Lord, it was, and it is, and it will be for a very long time to come, if not for ever.

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Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Diddy Bop” by Noname (ft. Raury & Cam O’bi):

I finally got my act together this week and checked out Chance the Rapper, who I’ve been reading about for what seems like ages, but whose music I hadn’t gotten around to listening to yet.  One of the performances I watched featured Noname, and that led me to this perfect piece of music.  I mean, good Lord, perfect.  It’s lyrically playful and thoughtful in equal measure. The three voices complement each other in that way that sounds effortless but you know takes a lot of work to get right. Musically, the instrumentation, melody and beat mix together to sound both like 2016 and 1982 at the same time, and to sound that way so seamlessly that it becomes a song both of its time, and completely out of it–this is a piece of music you’ll listen to in twenty years and it’ll sound just as fresh as yesterday or today or tomorrow. Listen to the full Noname album Telefone here and improve your life immeasurably. You can visit Noname’s official website here.

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Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Bowling Green” by The Kossoy Sisters:

The President of the United States and his cronies only call things “terrorism” if they’re done by brown people with muslimy names.  They don’t count what happened in Oklahoma City, or Quebec City, or Charleston, or Birstall, and so on, terrorism, because white people did it, and in some of those cases, white people weren’t the targets, victims, or community the terrorist intended to terrorize.  The President of the United States and his cronies are at best blind, at worse hypocrites, and at worst white supremacists who ignore and deny the suffering of people who don’t look or live like them, except when they celebrate it.

“Bowling Green” is an excellent song, performed here excellently by the Kossoy Sisters, who are wonderful.

Kellyanne Conway is a duplicitous liar.

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