Song of the Week: “Physical” by Julianna Hatfield

by Douglas Cowie on 27 April 2018

Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Physical” by Juliana Hatfield:

Physical” was a huge hit for erstwhile Greaser Olivia Newton-John in 1981, a time when your correspondent was far too young to really understand what Olivia meant about getting physical. In 1993, “Spin the Bottle,” a song with one of the greatest rhymes in pop/rock history, was a hit for erstwhile Blake Baby Juliana Hatfield (or, well, technically, The Juliana Hatfield Three, but anyway), a time when your correspondent was just the right age to understand what Juliana meant about five minutes in the closet with you (with me? No.). In 2018, Juliana Hatfield has released an album called Juliana Hatfield Sings Olivia Newton-John, and the long-awaited moment where your correspondent understands life* and both these songs in one place has arrived.  Thanks, Juliana!

*Your correspondent understands almost nothing about life.

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Song of the Week: “Earth Time” by Defisis

by Douglas Cowie on 20 April 2018

Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Earth Time” by Defisis:

I’d never heard of Defisis until I stumbled upon this Twitter thread by Will Ashon earlier this week, which convinced me that I should check him out. In that thread, which serves both as an introduction to Defisis and an obituary to Shaun Nicholson, you’ll see that Will Ashon highlights this track as his personal favorite. I figured if someone’s passion for an artist convinces me to listen, then I might as well start with that person’s favorite.  There’s a lot going on here, and I’ve only listened to it a few times, so I’m not going to try to break it all down here, but I just want to note that I’m a total sucker for music that leaves lots of space while also bringing lots of sound, and this song pulls off that technique masterfully. It’s a fantastic lyrical and vocal and musical performance.

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Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Old Nine Two Six Four Two Dies (No. 10)” by Mary Halvorson Trio:

Mary Halvorson is a seriously talented guitarist, and a seriously exciting musician. She’s a phenomenal technical player, which isn’t something I usually care about all that much, or think about all that much, except that part of what’s wonderful about Mary Halvorson’s music is the use to which she puts that technique. She can rip of arpeggios and scales as lightning quick as anybody, and she can improvise through whatever goofy jazz chord progressions you want to her, but when it comes down to it, what she seems to love most–or anyway, what I love most about listening to her music–is the sounds she can get out of that guitar, and the ways she can use a variety of techniques to rub those sounds together, and they ways the limits of those techniques can be reached and exceeded, and the thrilling music that bounces into your brain as a result.

Check out Mary Halvorson’s new album, Code Girl, here.

 

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Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Sevda Türküsü” by Grup Yorum:

Earlier this week I read an article in The Guardian about Turkish band Grup Yorum, so I thought I’d give them a listen.

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