Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Impeach the President” by The Honey Drippers:

Last week around our house we were listening to De La Soul, and started thinking about what a couple of their samples might be. Eventually we looked it up, and it turns out one of the samples we were wondering about was “Impeach the President” by The Honey Drippers. They’re singing about Nixon, of course: “Behind the walls of the White House / There’s a lot of things that we don’t know about. / Behind the walls of the White House / There’s a lot of things that we should know about.”

Works for 2017, too, yes.

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Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Memphis, Tennessee” by Chuck Berry:

But for Chuck Berry none of us would be here today.

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Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Last Kind Words” by Geeshie Wiley:

A couple of weeks ago I read this 2014 essay by John Jeremiah Sullivan about Geeshie Wiley and Elvie Thomas. It’s a fascinating story.

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Song of the Week: “Frijolero” by Molotov

by Douglas Cowie on 10 March 2017

Each Friday I pick a song–new, old, borrowed, blue–that’s been on my mind and in my ears, and write a short post about it.

This is “Frijolero” by Molotov:

I’ve been doing a lot of research into Mexican-American culture and history over the past several months, so my ears pricked up when an excerpt from this song crossed my path on Twitter earlier this week.  There’s a lot to like about this song from 2003: its blending of styles, its playfulness, the way in which the chorus recalls and parallels Sly and the Family Stone. It’s that last thing that hits the hardest: the 1969 message of Sly and the Family Stone filtered through a different lens in 2003, and a history that stretches at the very least to a border drawn in 1848 that when you listen to it in 2017 takes on even more meaning.

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